1. Education
Send to a Friend via Email

About an hour and a half drive north of Prague (Czech Republic) lies the small town of Terezin. This small town was originally part of a fortress built by Emperor Josef II between 1780 and 1790, which he named after his mother, Empress Maria Theresa. Originally built as protection against invading armies, the fortress was never used in this capacity; instead, it became infamous for its use by the Nazis during their occupation of Czechoslovakia. The fortress consists of two distinct sections: the "Small Fortress" which was used as a prison since the early nineteenth century and the "Large Fortress" which had become the garrison town named Terezin.

The Nazis appreciated these pre-built, solid enclosures. They realized that the walls and structure which had originally been built to keep intruders out, could easily be used to keep their prisoners within. Thus, the Nazis transformed the Small Fortress into a prison for their political prisoners and the Large Fortress into the Theresienstadt Ghetto.

I had the opportunity of visiting both the Small and Large Fortresses of Terezin during my trip to Eastern Europe in July 1998. The experience was powerful. To share this experience with you, I have created this virtual tour. Though I took dozens upon dozens of pictures, I have selected twenty-four to represent the tour.

Though I highly recommend taking the whole tour, you may always stop at any time and return to the home page of this site by clicking "welcome" in the left side of each page. Though I believe the captions that are attached to each of the pictures will make more sense if read in the order of the tour, I have also included a list of the pictures for your future reference and perusal.

The tour begins in the Small Fortress...

Start the Tour

All photographs © 1999 Jennifer Rosenberg


Subscribe to the Newsletter
Name
Email


Back to Holocaust Index

You can opt-out at any time. Please refer to our privacy policy for contact information.

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.